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In the spotlight--19th and early 20th century pearls, and early 20th century vegetable ivory, celluloid, and composition--don't miss it; see the bottom of this page, or click on "NEW!"

Buttons--pearl, glass, rhinestone, bakelite, china, fabric, wood, celluloid, horn,  pewter, cinnabar, fur, lucite, silver, brass, coral, enameled, bone, leather, pottery, rubber, vegetable
buttons2.jpg (12595 bytes)ivory, steel, cork, tortise, ivory, papier mache, porcelain, satsuma, bamboo, radiant, ivoroid, cloissone, whistle, jeweled, picture, military, railroad, uniform, baby, paperweight, moonglow, diminutive--their variation is endless. 

Anyone can collect buttons--tins of modern buttons are commonly found at garage sales and flea markets, and in Aunt Agnes' attic. All of the buttons you find in this manner may not have the value, or the fine materials of the vintage and antique buttons, but all old buttons show a multitude of interesting materials, and an endless variation of designs.  Buttons which are interesting,but not quite collectible can be well-used for crafts, for instance, or for a collection based on various materials.

Older buttons can ALSO still be found at garage sales, flea markets, andbuttons.jpg (9441 bytes) estatae sales, although buttons are going through the transformation that vintage and antique dolls have gone through in the last 10 years--as more and more people become aware of button collecting and the value of old buttons, it becomes harder and harder to find them.  Prices for fine collector buttons have skyrocketed; prices for such buttons in 'The Big Book Of Buttons" (aka, the button collectors' bible) have more than TRIPLED in many instances since its last printing in 1991.

Collectors have varied opinions of what constitutes a vintage button.  The National Button Society considers all buttons made after 1918 to be modern.  Does that mean that all after-1918 buttons are not collectible?  NO.   Personally, I find much of interest in ANY pre-1970 group of buttons.  In the 1960s, many buttons were all-metal (as opposed to the plastic-covered metal which is prevalent today) and there were numerous, absolutely beautiful glass buttons still being produced in Czechlosvakia.  Also, the plastics from the first half of the 1900s--bakelites, lucites, etc. are marvelous.  I predict that prices for these types of buttons, in mint condition, will begin to rise if the prices of the antique buttons continue to go out of sight.

Don't forget--see Vintage Buttons: NEW for this month--19th century pearls, and early 20th century vegetable ivory, composition, and celluloids in the spotlight!   Click on the button below to see these buttons:

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Click Here!

   
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